Pick of the Day: 1939 Packard 1708 Limousine

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1939 Packard 1708 Limousine

Being at SEMA, I’ve seen a lot of interesting creations, most of them intricate and interesting to look at, but at times they can feel overwhelming. Sure, SEMA is about the aftermarket which means a lot of mods and restoration components, but sometimes it’s good to just step back and appreciate the beauty of the original car without so many visual distractions.

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Pick of the Day: 1953 Packard Cavalier

Packard produced its Cavalier model for only three years
Packard produced its Cavalier model for only three years

Pick of the Day is a 1953 Packard Cavalier offered with only 71,831 miles since new, and with its exterior in original condition.

“During the mid-1950s, Packard needed to reinforce its identity as a premium luxury car manufacturer in the face of challenges from the Big Three,” the private seller from Trabuco Canyon, California, writes in the advertisement on ClassicCars.com. “With the ever newer car designs of the decade, the visual distinctions that had defined Packard were disappearing, interior luxury and performance were harder to express, and Packard management was regretting its decision to produce the entry-level Clipper series. Continue reading

Fire razes building used by America’s Packard Museum; classic cars, artifacts, equipment destroyed

Part of the destruction after the fire at the America’s Packard Museum facility | Jim Noelker/WHIO TV
Part of the destruction after the fire at the America’s Packard Museum facility | Jim Noelker/WHIO TV

A devastating fire destroyed a warehouse used by America’s Packard Museum near Dayton, Ohio, consuming a number of classic cars, irreplaceable parts and artifacts, and restoration facilities. The building is separate from the museum itself, which is located in the city of Dayton. Continue reading

Pick of the Day: 1958 Packard coupe

1958 Packard coupe has been owned by the same family since new
1958 Packard coupe has been owned by the same family for 45 years

The 1958 model year was the last for Packard and the seller of our Pick of the Day notes that only 675 of these coupes were produced.

According to the seller, who placed an advertisement for the car on ClassicCars.com, this 1958 Packard coupe is from South Dakota and is all original except for its 289 cid engine, which came from a 1964 Studebaker Lark. Continue reading

Classic Profile: 1928 Packard 443 custom roadster

Hollywood actor Richard Dix poses with the Packard in front of a movie facade | Courtesy of the author
Hollywood actor Richard Dix poses with the rakish Packard in front of a movie facade | Courtesy of the author

From the beginning, the stars born of the Hollywood movie industry have wanted to be seen in the best cars available. Richard Dix, seen here posing with a 1928 Packard 443 custom eight roadster, was just such a leading man.

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Coachbuilt beauties offered at Gooding auction in Pebble Beach

The 1962 Ferrari 250 GT was a one-off design by acclaimed stylist Giorgetto Giugiaro | Gooding photos
The 1962 Ferrari 250 GT was a one-off design by acclaimed stylist Giorgetto Giugiaro | Gooding photos

Two of the greatest and most-evocative examples of custom coachwork, one a pre-war American classic and the other a famous Italian beauty, will cross the auction block during Gooding & Company’s annual sale August 15 and 16 adjacent to the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance.

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1934 Packard takes best of show at Forest Grove

2015 Forest Grove Concours d'Elegance
2015 Forest Grove Concours d’Elegance Best of show 1934 Packard | Forest Grove Concours Photo

A 1934 Packard dual-cowl sport phaeton owned by Larry Nannini of Colma, California, was awarded Best In Show at the 2015 Forest Grove Concours d’Elegance on the campus of Pacific Universiry in Forest Grove, Oregon, 25 miles west of Portland.

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Packard, Cisitalia takes best of honors at Greenwich

1935 Packard 1201 convertible wins best of show among American cars at Greenwich | Andy Reid photos 1935 Packard 1201 convertible wins best of show among American cars at Greenwich | Andy Reid photos

This year marked the 20th anniversary for the Greenwich Concours and event founder Bruce Wennerstrom was on hand all weekend to help usher in his baby’s next decade. The classic car hobby owes him a debt of gratitude for starting this event and keeping it going for these many years. It is the only concours of its stature in New England. Continue reading

Classic Profile: Derham Body Company, last coachbuilder of the classic era

This 12-cylinder 1936 Pierce-Arrow was custom-bodied by Derham | Photos courtesy of the author
This 12-cylinder 1936 Pierce-Arrow was custom-bodied by Derham | Photos courtesy of the author

The Derham Company of Rosemont, Pennsylvania extended far past the life of most other American coachworks companies, surviving two world wars and the Great Depression. Continue reading

Along for the ride in the Arizona Concours driving tour

Steve Evans (left), his dad Bob and Gerri Dames on the tour in a 1909 Pierce-Arrow | Bob Golfen photos
Steve Evans (left), his dad Bob and Gerri Dames on the tour in a 1909 Pierce-Arrow | Bob Golfen photos

The bright-yellow 1928 Packard 526 sedan chugged sedately up the hills and through the desert scenery of Phoenix, Scottsdale and Paradise Valley, its five occupants reliving the arcane splendor of motoring from our grandparents’ day.

More-modern cars rushed past, seeming impatient and unruly compared with our regal passage amid the Packard’s mechanical rumblings and pungent scent of unfiltered exhaust.

This was Monday, the day after the second annual Arizona Concours d’Elegance, when a number of the rare and exquisite classic cars shown at the Arizona Biltmore resort took part in a new feature: a driving tour. The participants included sports cars, race cars, luxury cars and such old timers as the upright Packard.

The 1928 Packard sedan parked near the desert at Taliesin West
The 1928 Packard sedan parked near the desert at Taliesin West

Leaving the Biltmore, the historic parade organized by the Arizona Concours headed for Frank Lloyd Wright’s famous architecture school and tourist destination, Taliesin West in Scottsdale. Next stop was a visit to Scottsdale car collectors Bill and Linda Pope’s spectacular private museum. Then it was off to another Frank Lloyd Wright landmark, the unique Phoenix home the legendary architect built for his son and daughter-in-law, David and Gladys Wright.

My choice was to ride with a couple of the entrants to enjoy the full experience of the tour. First off was the yellow Packard, in which I joined owners Paul and Pam Friskopp of Omaha, Nebraska, and Scottsdale, and their friends Don and Peggy Peterson of Fountain Hills, Arizona.

The ride was slow and stately, the ancient six-cylinder engine laboring mightily to move the big 5,000-pound sedan and five humans. The non-synchro three-speed transmission, mechanical brakes and truck-like handling makes the Packard a handful to drive, but Paul wore a nonstop grin as we rolled along. Although, he said, stopping or turning requires some planning ahead.

“If you compare it with a Ford or Chevy of the era, this has a very large and heavy ride,” he explained.

Frank Lloyd Wright’s 1949 Crosley and 1937 AC Ace at Taliesin West
Frank Lloyd Wright’s 1949 Crosley and 1937 AC Ace at Taliesin West

The Packard is a beautifully restored car, the work performed by the owner himself, who started out with a battered wreck in what he called “scrap-yard condition.” That’s a far cry from the car’s lovely appearance now, with an interior designed to coddle the passengers, at least those in the spacious back seat. I was sitting up front with Paul, where the surroundings were a bit more spartan, perhaps with a chauffeur in mind.

“It’s all about the passengers,” Friskopp said. “There’s no carpet up front, just mats. That’s original.”

After the fun ride to Taliesin West, I switched to another classic vehicle that was nearly as different as possible from the veteran Packard. It was a powerful and evocative 1954 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL gullwing coupe, but not just any gullwing. This was the first one ever sold to the public, and its first owner was none other than famed American sportsman Briggs Cunningham.

“This car was never supposed to be sold,” said owner Dennis Nicotra of New Haven, Connecticut, noting that the 300SL was most-likely a pre-production or prototype car with significant differences from those eventually available in Mercedes showrooms. “There are no side mirrors and no bumper guards, which gives it a dramatically different look.”

The ex-Briggs Cunningham 1954 Mercedes-Benz 300SL gullwing coupe
The ex-Briggs Cunningham 1954 Mercedes-Benz 300SL gullwing coupe

Nicotra, a noted collector of high-end cars, said he pursued ownership of the Benz for decades.

“The previous owner had it for 42 years, and I was trying to get it for 35 years,” he said.

On the tour, he drove the car very gently, even gingerly, since it had only about 600 miles on it after its total restoration by German 300SL experts at H&K engineering in Polling, Germany. Once it is completely broken in, Nicotra said, he would drive it with a little more verve.

But you could feel the power and purposeful nature of the car even as we cruised through the suburban streets. The transmission has the stout whine of a full-racing gearbox, and the ride is firm but compliant.

“This is the best driving and running gullwing I have ever been in,” Nicotra said in praise of the restoration pros who transformed it into a showpiece.

When I first peeked under the gullwing passenger door at the very wide sill and snug space inside, I was worried how my too-tall frame would fit, or that I’d make an embarrassing spectacle of climbing aboard. Nicotra patiently gave me a quick lesson on how to enter the gullwing without blowing a gasket. Once inside, space was tight but acceptable.

The wide sill and tight confines of the 300SL's passenger seat
The wide sill and tight confines of the 300SL’s passenger seat

Then came the process of getting out once we arrived. As the owner explained, I had to lift my rear off the seat and onto the sill, then grab my right ankle and guide it out. Once there, you simply stand and pull out the other leg. Being careful, of course, not to dent your head on the raised door.

But it was a magnificent ride in a truly important automobile. Matter of fact, this car is so important that the Historic Vehicle Association is making it an upcoming entry into that most exclusive club of vehicles, the National Historic Vehicle Registry and Historic American Engineering Record that is permanently archived in the Library of Congress.

Only a handful of groundbreaking cars so far have been admitted for the permanent honor. The first one was the 1964 Shelby Cobra Daytona Coupe race car.

After I rode with Nicotra to the Wright House, he left to return to Taliesin West where HVA officials planned to interview him and take measurements and photos of the gullwing in anticipation of announcing the honor at the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance in March.

“This car just ticks off all the boxes,” Nicotra said.

The scene after arrival at the David and Gladys Wright House, the tour’s final stop
The scene after arrival at the David and Gladys Wright House, the tour’s final stop