Petersen, ClassicCars.com to showcase lowriders at Monterey

Lowrider on display at the Petersen Automotive Museum | Petersen photos
Lowrider on display at the Petersen Automotive Museum | Petersen photos

ClassicCars.com and the Petersen Automotive Museum launch a strategic partnership during Monterey Car Week, where they will stage a special exhibit of lowriders at McCall’s Motorworks Revival and at The Quail: A Motorsports Gathering. Continue reading

Museums: Hershey School ‘limbo’ wagon slated for restoration

One of the Hershey School's 'limbo wagons' is ready for restoration | AACA Museum photo
One of the Hershey School’s ‘limbo wagons’ is ready for restoration | AACA Museum photo

It was in 1959, during the 50th anniversary of the school and home for orphaned boys founded by Milton S. and Catherine Hershey, that the decision was made to provide a more home-style environment. Part of that change included purchasing a fleet of station wagons.

To replace the more formal school buses that had been used for student travel between housing units and the school, the school purchased a fleet of 1962 Chevrolet Biscayne wagons. Those wagons went to Stageway, a coachbuilder in Cincinnati, for conversion to hold a driver and as many as 13 students at a time. Continue reading

Lowrider Renaissance and the ‘art in defiance’ at the Petersen

El Rey and the Piñata in the Lowrider exhibit at the Petersen Automotive Museum | Larry Crane photos
El Rey and the Piñata in the Lowrider exhibit at the Petersen Automotive Museum | Larry Crane photos

Without irony, the art and artisans of the lowrider culture occupy the Petersen Automotive Museum’s gallery named for Armand Hammer, a collector of fine art representing some of the most controversial creative anarchy in the history of art — beginning with the creative anarchists of Florence who reintroduced lifelike humanism in the late 15th century after a millennium of Byzantine cartoons of lifeless icons. We call it The Rebirth (Renaissance). Continue reading

Hot rods (most beautiful and otherwise) featured at Petersen

AMBR winners and other hot rods lined up for Petersen museum exhibit | Petersen photos by Ted7
AMBR winners and other hot rods lined up for Petersen museum exhibit | Petersen photos by Ted7

Things are hoppin’ — quite literally — these days at the Petersen Automotive Museum, which just opened its newest exhibit of Lowriders, some of which can hop and dance. Next up is a Deuce Day celebration of the traditional hot rods that, depending on your age, might have carried you, or your parents, or perhaps even your grandparents from the dry lakes to the sock hop.

Coinciding with the 85th anniversary of flathead-V8-powered 1932 Fords, known among hot rodders as the deuce, is a second-floor exhibit in the museum featuring 10 of America’s Most Beautiful Roadsters. Continue reading

Year of the Lowrider includes new Petersen exhibition

Gilbert 'Magu" Lujan created Our Family Car, a 1950 Chevrolet sedan, that will be part of the exhibition | Petersen museum photos by Ted7
Gilbert ‘Magu” Lujan created Our Family Car, a 1950 Chevrolet sedan, that will be part of the exhibition | Petersen museum photos by Ted7

Why do Lowriders prefer Chevys? See related story.

2017 is emerging as the Year of the Lowrider.

Consider:

• Historical museums in Colorado and New Mexico recently concluded exhibitions focused on the colorful cruisers with their sometimes hyper-hydraulic suspension systems, and the museum in Santa Fe also published a significant new book on the subject. Continue reading

Chevy is vehicle of choice for Lowriders, and they’re not alone

1968 Chevrolet Impala 'El MuertoRider' by Artemio Rodriguez and John Jota Leanos | Petersen museum photos by Ted7
1968 Chevrolet Impala ‘El MuertoRider’ by Artemio Rodriguez and John Jota Leanos | Petersen museum photos by Ted7

There is a theory that Lowriders tend to favor Chevrolets because of the X-frame chassis General Motors introduced in the late 1950s, an undercarriage design that left room to accommodate the hydraulic suspension systems that enable these highly customized cars to live up to their goal of being driven low and slow. Continue reading

Seeing Red: The Petersen’s tribute to 70 years of Ferrari

Part of the 'Seeing Red' exhibition of Ferraris at the Petersen Automotive Museum | Larry Crane photos
Part of the ‘Seeing Red’ exhibition of Ferraris at the Petersen Automotive Museum | Larry Crane photos

Red, because Ferrari continues to honor the 1906 Federation International de l’Automobile decision to establish national racing colors to facilitate a spectator recognizing racers from his country — Italian participating cars would be red.

While there have been many manufacturers who spent vast amounts of money modifying production cars to improve racetrack performance, Ferrari in its early days made very minor modifications to make its racing sports cars street worthy. Continue reading

The Petersen salutes the All-American Racer, Dan Gurney

At Bonneville in 1950, Ted Bear (far left), engine-builder Raymond Torres, driver Dan Gurney and '29 Ford roadster-owner Skip Hudson
At Bonneville in 1950, Ted Bear (far left), engine-builder Raymond Torres, driver Dan Gurney (waving) and ’29 Ford roadster-owner Skip Hudson

Daniel Sexton Gurney’s father retired from a career in the aural glories of opera and moved his family to the wind-pushed murmurs of the citrus-covered foothills of Riverside, California. Tall, slender, handsome Dan was immediately became known as the prototypical California kid — and would be for the next 60 years (and counting). Continue reading

Petersen museum ‘Seeing Red’ with special Ferrari exhibit

A 250 GTO will be among 11 red Ferraris in Petersen museum's special display | Petersen photo by Scott Williamson Photodesign Studios
A 250 GTO will be among 11 red Ferraris in Petersen museum’s special display | Petersen photo by Scott Williamson Photodesign Studios

When the Petersen Automotive Museum reopened after being remodeled inside and out, it was the red-ribboned exterior that drew the most comment. But it was the “Precious Metal” display in the Bruce Meyer Family Gallery on the second floor that drew the longest and longing attention of car enthusiasts.

Arrayed around the gallery were some of the world’s most spectacular vehicles, all of them wearing silver-colored bodywork. Long-time car collector and Petersen board member Bruce Meyer had convinced each car’s owner to loan their vehicles to the museum for an extended period. Continue reading

Motorcycle rumble: It’s Harley vs. Indian at the Petersen

Vintage racing motorcycles are only part of the Harley vs. Indian exhibit at the Petersen |Larry Edsall photos
Vintage racing motorcycles are only part of the Harley vs. Indian exhibit at the Petersen |Larry Edsall photos

It was “a nearly religious war waged in dealerships and race tracks,” noted Cycle World magazine editor Mark Hoyer. And now, “Harley vs. Indian” is being waged again, and not only at their respective dealerships and on race tracks across the country but in a new exhibit at the Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles. Continue reading