All posts by Steve Evans

Steve Evans is a second-generation car guy whose passion for collector cars spans all eras. A Phoenix resident, Steve serves on the committee for the Arizona Concours d’Elegance and is the editor of a vintage motoring blog. A collector of all things automotive, Steve’s current object of interest is a 1927 Locomobile.

Classic Profile: 1909 American Gadabout

An Edwardian party out for a drive in a 1909 American Gadabout | Photo courtesy of the author
An Edwardian party out for a drive in a 1909 American Gadabout | Photo courtesy of the author

The distinctive cars of the American Motor Car Company (1906–1914) of Indianapolis, Indiana, have gained a bit of notoriety as of late, achieving some of the highest prices paid for an Edwardian-era vehicle at auction.

These sales are all related to the company’s American Underslung models with their advanced low-profile suspensions. But when the company was established, they hired Indianapolis local Harry C. Stutz, who would design a very handsome large-displacement touring car in the prevailing style with a traditional suspension, such as the 1909 American Gadabout shown in this period photo. Continue reading

Classic Profile: 1928 Packard 443 custom roadster

Hollywood actor Richard Dix poses with the Packard in front of a movie facade | Courtesy of the author
Hollywood actor Richard Dix poses with the rakish Packard in front of a movie facade | Courtesy of the author

From the beginning, the stars born of the Hollywood movie industry have wanted to be seen in the best cars available. Richard Dix, seen here posing with a 1928 Packard 443 custom eight roadster, was just such a leading man.

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Classic Profile: 1932 Stutz Super Bearcat

The Stutz Super Bearcat was powered by a twin-overhead-cam straight-eight engine | Courtesy of the author
The Stutz Super Bearcat was powered by a twin-overhead-cam straight-eight engine | Courtesy of the author

Wearing a set of Goodrich Silvertown whitewall tires – distinguished by the double diamonds on the sidewall – the shortened chassis of the 1932 Stutz Super Bearcat is clearly apparent. At only 116 inches, the wheelbase was a full foot and a half shorter than the standard offering. In comparison, today’s Ferrari FF rides on a 117.7 inch wheelbase. Continue reading

Classic profile: 1930 duPont Series G Special Sport Sedan

The 1930 duPont Series G by Merrimac was shown in this period photograph | Courtesy of the writer
The 1930 duPont Series G Special Sport Sedan by Merrimac was shown in this period photograph | Courtesy of the author

As you’ve probably guessed, I enjoy searching for old photos of early cars. During Monterey Classic Car Week, this means a stop at Automobilia Monterey, and it was there that I found this image of a uniquely bodied duPont Series G Special Sport Sedan.

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Classic Profile: 1909 Stoddard-Dayton Model 9K

The Stoddard-Dayton touring car was photographed in London | Courtesy of the author
The Stoddard-Dayton touring car was photographed in London | Courtesy of the author

Illustrating the pride of Dayton, Ohio, this picture shows a Stoddard-Dayton Model 9K posed in London. The building in the background appears to be Britain’s House of Commons or Parliament Building, and the picture might have been taken from the embankment across the Thames River.

The Stoddard name was already well-established and respected within Dayton. It was John Stoddard’s farm-implements business that put Dayton on the map as a center for industrial production. Together with his son Charles, the two would turn to automobile manufacturing with the Dayton Motor Car Company in 1905. Continue reading

Classic profile: Cup-winning 1905 Richard-Brasier

The Richard-Brasier race car was shown at the 1905 Paris Salon | Courtesy of the author
The Richard-Brasier race car was shown at the 1905 Paris Salon | Courtesy of the author

I came across this postcard in Monterey last year and couldn’t resist. As it states, the card illustrates the Richard-Basier stand at the Paris Salon in 1905. The star-car of the French show, the 1905 Gordon-Bennett winning racer is seen front and center.

The French firm of Richard-Brasier has a confusing history with many name changes, but the story starts with brothers Georges and Maxine Richards. They entered the bicycle business in 1893 and a few years later started manufacturing vehicles resembling the Benz Velo. In 1901, they enticed Henri Brasier, the chief designer for Mors, to join the team. His impact was immediate and by 1902, Brasier’s name was added to the marque. Continue reading

Classic Profile: Maserati wins 1939 Indianapolis 500

Wilbur Shaw in the Maserati 8CTF at Indy | Indianapolis Motor Speedway
Wilbur Shaw in the Maserati 8CTF at Indy | Indianapolis Motor Speedway

In 1938, Ernesto Maserati developed the Maserati 8CTF to compete with the likes of Mercedes and Auto Union on the European GP circuit. Although not particularly successful on the Continent, the car gained fame stateside with a historic victory at the Indianapolis 500. Continue reading

Classic Profile: Rolls-Royce comes to America

Rolls-Royce Model 30 Roi des Belges demonstrator car in New York City | Photos courtesy of the author
Rolls-Royce Model 30 Roi des Belges demonstrator car in New York City in 1906 | Photos courtesy of the author

Rolls-Royce Motor Cars famously started after an introduction in 1904 between Charles Rolls, a young automobile enthusiast and dealer of French automobiles, and Henry Royce, a middle-aged manufacturer of electrical components. Continue reading

Classic Profile: Derham Body Company, last coachbuilder of the classic era

This 12-cylinder 1936 Pierce-Arrow was custom-bodied by Derham | Photos courtesy of the author
This 12-cylinder 1936 Pierce-Arrow was custom-bodied by Derham | Photos courtesy of the author

The Derham Company of Rosemont, Pennsylvania extended far past the life of most other American coachworks companies, surviving two world wars and the Great Depression. Continue reading

Classic Profile: 1921-26 Duesenberg Straight Eight

This Duesenberg Straight Eight has sedan bodywork by Charles Schutte | Courtesy of the author
This Duesenberg Straight Eight has sedan bodywork by Charles Schutte | Courtesy of the author

The Automobile Trade Journal of July 1, 1920, wrote, “The Duesenberg Automobile & Motors Corp. has bought a factory site in Indianapolis and plans 2,400 cars the first year of operation. In addition to a special Duesenberg engine, the car will be equipped with four-wheel brakes and an axle designed by Fred S. Duesenberg. The new car is stated to be 400 lbs lighter than those of similar power and will obtain from 18 to 22 miles on a gallon of gasoline.” Continue reading