All posts by Larry Edsall

A former daily newspaper sports editor, Larry Edsall spent a dozen years as an editor at AutoWeek magazine before making the transition to writing for the Web and becoming the author of more than 15 books. In addition to being Editorial Director at ClassicCars.com, Larry has written for The New York Times, writes a weekly automotive feature for The Detroit News and is an adjunct honors professor at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State Univeristy.

Star power helps two cars sell for record prices at H&H

Capri with TV credits tops high pre-auction estimate | H&H Classics photos
Capri with TV credits tops high pre-auction estimate | H&H Classics photos

A car with royal history and one seen several decades ago on British television set world auction price records for their respective makes and models Wednesday at H&H Classics sale at the Imperial War Museum in Duxford. Continue reading

Victoria’s Secret owner finally gets his $18.3 million Ferrari

The 'Fearsome Forty-Nine' was the last of the 1954 375 Plus Ferraris and subject of a long legal dispute | Bonhams 2014 photo
The ‘Fearsome Forty-Nine’ was the last of the 1954 375 Plus Ferraris and subject of a long legal dispute | Bonhams 2014 photo

The bidder who paid then-record $18.3 million at a Bonhams auction two years ago finally has won the right to possess his 1954 Ferrari 375 Plus, a car known as the “Fearsome Four-Nine.” Continue reading

1931 Talbot 105 Alpine wins Flying Scotsman vintage rally

Muddy but smiling faces in a 1935 Riley 12/4 Special 1495 on the Flying Scotsman Rally | Endurance Rally Associaiton photos
Muddy but smiling faces in a 1935 Riley 12/4 Special 1495 on the Flying Scotsman Rally | Endurance Rally Associaiton photos

There were 110 historic vehicles and their drivers and co-drivers facing rain, hail, sleet and snow on a 700-mile Flying Scotsman vintage rally that turned out to be the most challenging in the event’s eight-year history. At the finish, a 1931 Talbot 105 Alpine manned by Gareth Burnett and Martyn Turner won, ending Bentley’s winning streak.

Continue reading

Last of the NART Spiders headed to RM Sotheby’s Monaco auction

1968 Ferrari 275 GTS/4 NART Spider will be offered for sale at Monaco | RM Sotheby's photo by Tom Gidden
1968 Ferrari 275 GTS/4 NART Spider will be offered for sale at Monaco | RM Sotheby’s photo by Tom Gidden

No. 11057 wasn’t only the 10th and therefore the last of the 1968 Ferrari 275 GTS/4 NART Spiders, it was the only example originally sold in Europe of the car like the one Steve McQueen drove in the original The Thomas Crown Affair.

As a result, RM Sotheby’s expects 11057 to be “one of the most valuable automobiles offered at auction in 2016” when it crosses the block at the auction house’s Monaco sale scheduled for May 14.

RM Sotheby’s expects the NART Spider, which also was the third-to-last of all the 275 models built, “to fetch in excess of €19 million,” according to the auction house news release. That number translates to $21.59 million. Continue reading

Ed Welburn: Management by design

Ed Welburn's sketch of his 1987 Oldsmobile Aerotech | GM
Ed Welburn’s sketch of his 1987 Oldsmobile Aerotech | GM photos

Funny, isn’t it, how some memories stick with us. News that Ed Welburn is retiring as head of design at General Motors triggered the memory of the day I first heard Welburn’s name.

It was the autumn of 1987. I had just arrived as the new motorsports editor at AutoWeek as Kevin Wilson, the magazine’s auto industry news editor, was returning from Fort Stockton, Texas, where he’d covered A.J. Foyt setting a series of closed-course speed records in an elongated vehicle called the Oldsmobile Aerotech. Continue reading

Pick of the Day: 1946 Triumph 1800 roadster

1946 Triumph 1800 seats five in a compact package
1946 Triumph 1800 seats five in a compact package

Bicycles starting in 1863, and then motorized two-wheelers in 1902, and even a three-wheeler in 1903, but wasn’t until 1923, well into the automobile age, that Triumph produced its first motorcar.

By 1930, Triumph Cycle had become Triumph Motor Co., although during World War II, its primary product was motorcycles for Allied armies. The British company became part of Standard Motor with post-war automobile production resuming in 1946 with the 1800 sedan and roadster, cars designed to compete head-to-head with Jaguar. Continue reading

Driven: 2016 Volkswagen Golf TSI SEL

2016 VW Golf at Zion National Park | Larry Edsall photos
2016 VW Golf at Zion National Park | Larry Edsall photos

And still champion!

After several decades as the world’s best-selling car, and in many ways not only taking that title from Henry Ford’s Model T but becoming the spiritual successor as well to the car that put the world on mechanically powered wheels, Volkswagen’s Beetle no longer could be made viable as a safe or efficient vehicle. Continue reading

Quattroruote Collection added to RM Sotheby’s Monaco sale

1939 Bugatti Type 57 cabriolet has Gangloff coachwork and was factory demo | RM Sotheby's photos
1939 Bugatti Type 57 cabriolet has Gangloff coachwork and was factory demo | RM Sotheby’s photos

Yes, there were the Agnellis and their Fiats, and Enzo and his red racing cars, but there are those who will tell you that it was Gianni Mazzocchi who really put Italy on wheels. And now many of Mazzocchi’s own cars will be offered for sale as the Quattroruote Collection at RM Sotheby’s auction May 14 at Monaco. Continue reading