All posts by Larry Edsall

A former daily newspaper sports editor, Larry Edsall spent a dozen years as an editor at AutoWeek magazine before making the transition to writing for the Web and becoming the author of more than 15 books. In addition to being Editorial Director at ClassicCars.com, Larry has written for The New York Times, writes a weekly automotive feature for The Detroit News and is an adjunct honors professor at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State Univeristy.

Still looking for that ideal holiday gift? How about a $46,328 ‘cocktail hamper’ from Rolls-Royce?

Rolls-Royce offers the $46,328 'Cocktail Hamper' | Rolls-Royce photo
Rolls-Royce offers the $46,328 ‘Cocktail Hamper’ | Rolls-Royce photo

I didn’t even know what a “cocktail hamper” was until the news release arrived from Rolls-Royce informing us that it has created a limited-edition of 15 such hampers “to meet the needs of customers who wish to relax and enjoy something a little beyond the traditional glass of Champagne.”

And I suppose that if such a way to relax and enjoy has become your tradition, you might not even flinch at the $46,328 price tag. Continue reading

Auctionata’s ‘Porsche Only’ sale is Saturday

This 1977 935 racer and transporter are offered as a single lot | Auctionata photos
The 1977 Porsche 935 racer and1968 Magirus Deutz transporter are offered as a single lot | Auctionata photos

After selling only five of 28 cars (well, 27 cars and a 1960 Unimog 4×4) Tuesday at its Mercedes-Benz Only event, Berlin-based Auctionata moves to its Porsche Only auction Saturday, when 25 vehicles are scheduled to cross the block. Continue reading

Military ‘jeep’ prototype joins National Historic Vehicle Register

1940 Ford Pilot Model GP-No. 1 joins National Historic Vehicle Registry | HVA photos
1940 Ford Pilot Model GP-No. 1 joins National Historic Vehicle Register | HVA photos

The 1940 Ford Pilot Model GP-No. 1 Pygmy, the prototype for what would become known around the world as the U.S military Jeep, and later would spawn an entire automotive brand, has been selected as the eighth vehicle to be recorded in the Historic Vehicle Association’s National Historic Vehicle Register.

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25 classics, wristwatch, historic license plate bring $8.8 million at Bonhams auction

Some of the cars offered up for bidding at Bonhams Bond Street auction | Bonhams photos
Some of the cars offered up for bidding at Bonhams Bond Street auction | Bonhams photos

The auction of 25 cars — including Donald Healey’s own car and his Rolex watch — as well as vehicle registration No. R6 generated $13.27 million in sales Sunday at Bonhams’ Bond Street Motor Car Sale at the company’s headquarters in London. Continue reading

Pick of the Day: 1912 Cadillac Phaeton

1912 Cadillac was among first to have an electric starter
1912 Cadillac was among first to have an electric starter

What do electric starters and starting college have in common? In the case of a family in Fowlerville, Michigan, children starting college has resulted in the need to sell a 1912 Cadillac Phaeton, one of the first automobiles equipped with an electric starter.

In the case of this Cadillac, it’s been owned by the same family for more than a half century. Continue reading

Eye Candy: ‘Precious Metal’ at the Petersen Automotive Museum

1954 Mercedes-Benz W196 among silver cars in a special display | Larry Edsall photos
1954 Mercedes-Benz W196 among silver cars in a special display | Larry Edsall photos

Yesterday, we shared an Eye Candy gallery on the remodeled Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles. In that display we included only one photograph from the inaugural exhibit in the museum’s new Bruce Meyer Family Gallery, a special exhibit space on the museum’s second floor. Continue reading

Bookshelf: A tale of black and white — and green

Back in August, we published a story about the “Green Book” exhibit at the Gilmore Car Museum in Michigan. To refresh your memory, The Negro Travelers’ Green Book was published by a New York City mail carrier, Victor Hugo Green, who enlisted his fellow mail carriers around the country to help him compile and update lists of places — restaurants, hotels, gasoline stations — that would accommodate African-American travelers.

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