All posts by Andy Reid

Andy Reid’s first car, purchased at age 15, was a 1968 Fiat 124 coupe. His second, obtained by spending his college savings fund, was a 1966 Ferrari 330 GT 2+2. Since then, he has owned more than 150 cars, “none of them normal or reasonable,” as well as numerous classic motorcycles and scooters. A veteran of film, television, advertising and helping to launch a few Internet-based companies, Reid was a columnist for Classic Motorsports magazine for 12 years and has written for several other publications. He is considered an expert in European sports and luxury cars and is a respected concours judge. He lives in Canton, Connecticut.

Pick of the Day: 1988 Porsche 924S

The Porsche 924S was powered by the engine and transmission of the upmarket 944
The Porsche 924S was powered by the engine and transmission of the upmarket 944

It seems that everywhere you look, people are talking about the four-cylinder, front-engine Porsche transaxle cars. The 924 and 944 quite literally kept Porsche in business during a rough patch in the 1970s and ’80s. They were affordable Porsches, and they made great first Porsches for many people to introduce them to the sports car brand.

Like any Porsche aimed at the lower end of the market, they depreciated badly, to the point where you could buy for one as little as $3,500. And like other budget Porsches, such as the once-ridiculed and now wildly popular mid-engine 914, they have started to appreciate and are finally considered collectible Porsches, with prices rising accordingly. Continue reading

Pick of the Day: 1992 Aston Martin Virage coupe

The Aston Martin Virage is from the last of the revered marque's classic era
The Aston Martin Virage is from the last of the revered marque’s classic era

Aston Martin. The name brings up images of exotic locales, racing victories and, of course, James Bond.

Aston Martin motorcars have always been some of the most exclusive and desirable in the world, and so prices for these automotive works of art are quite high, often costing more than the average house. Continue reading

Originality showcased at Misselwood Concours

1963 Chevrolet Corvette still looks showroom fresh more than 50 years after production | Andy Reid photos
1963 Chevrolet Corvette still looks showroom fresh more than 50 years after production | Andy Reid photos

The focus this year for the Misselwood Concours was original, preserved rather than restored cars.

Several such vehicles were presented, including a completely original 1963 Chevrolet Corvette roadster owned by the same family since new, as well as a 1980 Mazda RX-7 special edition that looked just as it did when it left the factory. Continue reading

Pick of the Day: 1973 Volkswagen Thing

The VW Thing has the same chassis and mechanical parts as a Beetle
The VW Thing has the same chassis and mechanical parts as a Beetle

Say you want a classic car that you can show and take to events, but also drive on the beach. That could be a classic Jeep or a dune buggy, or this one from Germany, which was marketed when new as the Car That Does Everything: the Volkswagen Type 181 Thing.

The Pick of the Day is a 1973 Volkswagen Thing, a fun car that can do a lot of what a vintage Jeep does, and based on the tried-and-true VW Beetle chassis and mechanical parts. Continue reading

Pick of the Day: 1927 Ford Model T Speedster

The Model T has been fitted with a sporty Speedster body
The Model T has been fitted with a sporty Speedster body

Buying a classic car is really not the most logical decision, and there are a lot of people out there who should think twice when considering buying one. Those people would be happier in a modern sporty car, such as a Dodge Challenger or Porsche Boxster.

Then there are those of us who live and breath classic cars, where every difficulty is merely a challenge to be overcome, and the higher the level of difficulty a collector car presents, the more we enjoy it. It is as if we welcome the potential for adversity, or actually look for it in the cars we buy. Continue reading

Pick of the Day: 1984 Ferrari Mondial QV Cabriolet

The Ferrari Mondial is a mid-engine, four-seat convertible
The Ferrari Mondial is a mid-engine, four-seat convertible

Ferrari 308 prices have fallen back a bit, although at the current $40,000-$50,000 mark, they are still beyond the means of many prospective collectors. But there is an affordability light at the end of the Ferrari tunnel, and that is the Ferrari Mondial.

The Mondial was Ferrari’s replacement for the 308 GT4 and in my personal experience, one of the nicest-driving mid-engine Ferrari road cars ever. While many people do not care for the styling, I see it as a perfect 1980s time capsule, with elements of the 308 and the later Testarossa combined into a good-looking package. Mondail also is comfortable for long trips, is fun to drive, is fast enough to be entertaining and is a real-deal Ferrari from the Enzo era. Continue reading

Pick of the Day: 1947 Buick Roadmaster Sedanette

The Buick looks correct in its original paint hue and wide whitewalls
The Buick looks correct in its original paint hue and wide whitewalls

For some reason, Buicks are among the best values across the classic American car market. Why this is the case continually baffles me. Buick introduced many revolutionary firsts in the U.S. auto industry, including the overhear-valve engine, the straight-8 engine, the synchromesh manual transmission and the dynaflow automatic transmission.

Buick was innovative throughout its history, but somehow people have forgotten this. Heck, the first concept car built in this country, Harley J. Earl’s innovative 1938 Y-Job, was a Buick. Continue reading

Analysis: It’s become a buyer’s market, but for how long?

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Cars such as this 1971 Pontiac Trans-Am are popular with a new generation of bidders | Auctions America photo

Monterey Car Week is coming up quickly and a lot has been happening in the classic car auction marketplace leading up to what serves as the Super Bowl of the auction year.

In recent weeks, we have had the Auctions America sale in northern Indiana, the Mecum auction at Indy, RM Sotheby’s at Santa Monica and the Barrett-Jackson Northeast sale in Connecticut.

Our analysis: If you are in the hunt for a car priced at $150,000 or less, including a lot less, this has definitely become a buyer’s market. Continue reading

Pick of the Day: 1968 Shelby GT350

The Shelby looks nicely finished in correct Sunlit Gold
The Shelby looks nicely finished in correct Sunlit Gold

There are Mustangs and then there are Mustangs. Ford built a lot of pony cars, and while many are just standard Mustangs, there are a number of them that are a lot more interesting and valuable than others.

The top of the heap for street cars is the 1965 Shelby GT350. Sadly, the cost for one of these is north of $300,000. But there are a number of other special Mustangs out there that are a lot more affordable and still very special, which leads me to the Pick of the Day, a 1968 Shelby GT350 located in Springfield, Ohio. Continue reading

Andy’s picks at Barrett-Jackson’s Northeast auction

The Barrett-Jackson Northeast auction in Connecticut is in its second year and offers a docket of more than 600 cars. I have picked 6 very different cars from among them that I would gladly raise my hand for and like to have in my garage.

The best part about this list is that, with one exception, all these picks are what I would consider to be on the more affordable side of the hobby and any would make a good car for the first-time collector. Continue reading