All posts by Andy Reid

Andy Reid’s first car, purchased at age 15, was a 1968 Fiat 124 coupe. His second, obtained by spending his college savings fund, was a 1966 Ferrari 330 GT 2+2. Since then, he has owned more than 150 cars, “none of them normal or reasonable,” as well as numerous classic motorcycles and scooters. A veteran of film, television, advertising and helping to launch a few Internet-based companies, Reid was a columnist for Classic Motorsports magazine for 12 years and has written for several other publications. He is considered an expert in European sports and luxury cars and is a respected concours judge. He lives in Canton, Connecticut.

Pick of the Day: 1947 Buick Roadmaster Sedanette

The Buick looks correct in its original paint hue and wide whitewalls
The Buick looks correct in its original paint hue and wide whitewalls

For some reason, Buicks are among the best values across the classic American car market. Why this is the case continually baffles me. Buick introduced many revolutionary firsts in the U.S. auto industry, including the overhear-valve engine, the straight-8 engine, the synchromesh manual transmission and the dynaflow automatic transmission.

Buick was innovative throughout its history, but somehow people have forgotten this. Heck, the first concept car built in this country, Harley J. Earl’s innovative 1938 Y-Job, was a Buick. Continue reading

Analysis: It’s become a buyer’s market, but for how long?

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Cars such as this 1971 Pontiac Trans-Am are popular with a new generation of bidders | Auctions America photo

Monterey Car Week is coming up quickly and a lot has been happening in the classic car auction marketplace leading up to what serves as the Super Bowl of the auction year.

In recent weeks, we have had the Auctions America sale in northern Indiana, the Mecum auction at Indy, RM Sotheby’s at Santa Monica and the Barrett-Jackson Northeast sale in Connecticut.

Our analysis: If you are in the hunt for a car priced at $150,000 or less, including a lot less, this has definitely become a buyer’s market. Continue reading

Pick of the Day: 1968 Shelby GT350

The Shelby looks nicely finished in correct Sunlit Gold
The Shelby looks nicely finished in correct Sunlit Gold

There are Mustangs and then there are Mustangs. Ford built a lot of pony cars, and while many are just standard Mustangs, there are a number of them that are a lot more interesting and valuable than others.

The top of the heap for street cars is the 1965 Shelby GT350. Sadly, the cost for one of these is north of $300,000. But there are a number of other special Mustangs out there that are a lot more affordable and still very special, which leads me to the Pick of the Day, a 1968 Shelby GT350 located in Springfield, Ohio. Continue reading

Andy’s picks at Barrett-Jackson’s Northeast auction

The Barrett-Jackson Northeast auction in Connecticut is in its second year and offers a docket of more than 600 cars. I have picked 6 very different cars from among them that I would gladly raise my hand for and like to have in my garage.

The best part about this list is that, with one exception, all these picks are what I would consider to be on the more affordable side of the hobby and any would make a good car for the first-time collector. Continue reading

Pick of the Day: 1976 Porsche 912E coupe

Porsche used it leftover 914 engines to create a new entry-level model
Porsche used it leftover 914 engines to create a new entry-level model

In 1976, Porsche had a problem: they did not have an entry-level sports car in their lineup. The 914 was being phased out and the incoming 924 was not yet ready for market. Their solution was one of the more-interesting stop-gap measures ever created.

While the mid-engine 914 was essentially history, Porsche still had a quantity of the air-cooled four-cylinder boxer engines from that car and nowhere to use them. Their master plan was to take those engines and put them into some 911s instead of their usual six-cylinder engines, thus creating a reborn, one-year generation of the previously discontinued 912. Continue reading

Elegance at Hershey lives up to its name

Cars on the lawn at the Hotel Hershey for The Elegance at Hershey concours -- and more | Andy Reid photos
Cars on the lawn at the Hotel Hershey for The Elegance at Hershey concours — and more | Andy Reid photos

The Elegance at Hershey is one of those events that collectors and spectators just love to attend. Part of this has to do with the incredible venue.

Held at the Hotel Hershey courtyard in eastern Pennsylvnia, the Elegance at Hershey provides a feeling of old world elegance. It is difficult to think of a better backdrop for viewing and enjoying classic automobiles.

This year not only were the cars better than before, but so were the seminars and the Grand Ascent hillclimb that opens the weekend. Continue reading

Pick of the Day: 1974 Porsche 914 1.8

The once-unappreciated Porsche 914 has a renew fan base and  values that are rising
The once-unappreciated Porsche 914 has a renew fan base and values that are rising

If you showed up at a Porsche club meeting even 20 years ago with a 914, you likely would be viewed as barely qualifying for membership. If the car was a 914/6, well that was a bit different. But with a standard four-cylinder 914, you were basically tolerated and mostly ignored.

It’s funny how the passage of time changes people’s perspectives. During the past few years, the mid-engine Porsche 914 has had quite a renaissance, becoming a bona fide collectible Porsche right alongside the 356 and the 911. In fact, the Porsche 914 was celebrated a few years back at the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance, where 10 of these great little cars graced the field and drew good-sized crowds to see them. Continue reading

Jalopy Showdown immersed in old-school hot-rod lifestyle

In a throwback to a bygone era, jalopies race around Latimore Valley Fairgrounds track | Andy Reid photos
In a throwback to a bygone era, jalopies race around Latimore Valley Fairgrounds track | Andy Reid photos

While attending the Carlisle Import and Performance Nationals a few weeks ago, I heard about a very different kind of car show only about half-an-hour’s drive away.

After only 15 miles driving Pennsylvania back roads, a friend and I arrived at the Latimore Valley Fairgrounds, where we found a dirt oval and scores of vintage flat-head and 4-banger hot rods racing. Also taking turns on the track were riders of vintage motorcycles. Continue reading

$38 well spent: Harley-Davidson’s Steel Toe Tour

Motorcycle on the assembly line on Harley's York plant | Harley-Davidson photos
Motorcycle on the assembly line on Harley’s York plant | Harley-Davidson photos

In addition of collecting cars, I am a classic motorcycle collector. While I love my classic bikes, they are not without their issues.

A few months ago I went out to my shop to fire up one of my old bikes. I tried the Norton Commando and it would not start. Next, I tried my Triumph, same story. Finally I got on my BMW and even it would not run properly. To say I was disappointed is an understatement.

Happily, there is a bike you can buy today that offers many of the things that a classic motorcycle offers both in looks and sound, yet is reliable and can be used as a daily rider with ease. That bike is the Harley-Davidson. Continue reading

Pick of the Day: 1979 MGB Limited Edition

The MGB Limited Edition was an effort by the British automaker to put a special spin on the long-live sports car
The MGB Limited Edition was an effort by the British automaker to put a special spin on the long-live sports car

By the mid-1970s, the MGB was getting long in the tooth. The sports car had grown heavier due to DOT crash regulations, which included awkward rubber bumpers front and rear, and slower due to EPA emissions regulations. But the British automaker had no money for a redesign or to substantially upgrade any part of the car to bring the poor MGB’s performance even up to the level from when it was introduced. Continue reading